I suggest a campaign about ...

http://www.ippprisonerscampaign.com/petition.htm - IPP being abolished, not amended, existing IPP prisoners languish trapped no end in sight

http://www.ippprisonerscampaign.com/petition.htm - IPP being abolished, not amended, existing IPP prisoners languish trapped in a broken system with no end in sight costing tax-payers £143,500,000 per year for the prisoners past their tariff.

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    AmandaAmanda shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

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      • karl stephenskarl stephens commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I'm an ipp prisoner sentenced in 2005 for gbh released in September 2013. Now I'm being recalled for not living where I told probation. Not true. Being in a relationship. Not true. drinking alcohol not true. There is no evidence of any of this. Since being released I've got myself on a college course to train as an electrician & I'm working as one. Now because of hearsay & probation I'm now going back to jail? Who benefits from this? What does it achieve?

      • AnonymousAnonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        i have just come back from Norwich prison visiting someone that was given an ipp order of 4 years and has served 8 years to date. being moved all over the country to achieve these courses required. after completing several and still no closer to being released. how can this happen

      • chris watkinchris watkin commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        My friend is serving 7 years IPP tariff ending in December 2014, if some prisoners 7 years for a 12 month tariff then does that mean he will have to serve 70 years !!!

      • Andy I'AnsonAndy I'Anson commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        my brother is a ipp inmate got told he would do 12,months or over and 7,years on he is still in he has done what they say he has had his up and downs with the screws and been in some mad jails we are from preston lancs

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        hi there im looking for support regarding my son who received a 15 month tariff in 2008 but 1 year on remand prior to sentence and is still in side.

      • Carole MurrieCarole Murrie commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        The general public know nothing about this, in my experience and therefore do not understand what prisoners and their loved ones are going through, it seems like a hopeless situation.

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        A Kafkaesque nightmare

        05/10/2012

        The European Court of Human Rights has rulee that detaining IPP prisoners post tariff without access to appropriate offending behaviour courses is arbitrary and breaches human rights. GCN's Sarah Daley and Tony Quinlan of Switalskis Solicitors have written an article for Inside Time, the national newspaper for prisoners, looking at what impact this ruling will have.

        In the article, Sarah Daley and Tony Quinlan clarify the decision of the ECHR and set out the kinds of claims that may be able to proceed following this judgment.

        Read the full Inside Time article here:

        http://www.insidetime.org/articleview.asp?a=1311&c=a_kafkaesque_nightmare
        Quick links

        > 18/9/12 ECHR rules IPP sentences breach human rights Art 5(1)

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        • What IPP’S and their families don’t deserve is continuing mental torture and life where the ‘light at the end of the tunnel’moves two steps away for every one that I take towards it.
        "IPP "Petition.Thank you for your support.
        I am an IPP prisoner with a 2½ year ‘tariff’. I have been in prison for five years and eight months. I’ve always accepted that I deserved a prison sentence but what I and other IPPs and their families don’t deserve is continuing mental torture and a life where the ‘light at the end of the tunnel’ moves two steps away for every one that I take towards it.
        A brief history of my sentence then: I went to my first Parole Hearing after three years with a completed sentence plan and with a recommendation for release by OMU, external probation and psychology. I received the maximum two year knockback! I recently went to my second Parole hearing after five years and seven months inside. I was recommended for release by OMU, external probation, psychology and an independent psychologist with a CV the size of war and peace. My solicitor was confident that I would get, at the very least, open conditions. Another knockback! I’m still awaiting the length. By the way, all through my sentence my prison reports have been glowing. I have been a Listener, an Insider, Wing Rep, Canteen Rep, I induct new prisoners, I’m a classroom assistant and I’m doing a degree. I had also, on legal advice, appealed the severity of my sentence. My barrister, who undertook the costs, believed that the length of my sentence was ‘manifestly excessive’ and that I shouldn’t have received an IPP. Despite similar and more serious cases not receiving IPPs my appeal failed. My grandmother recently died and my father has a serious illness. In the last year one IPP on my landing committed suicide and I found one (an otherwise fit forty year old) dead in his cell of a heart attack. I suffer from hypertension and have been getting stress attacks for the last month or so.
        As the House of Lords ‘bottled it’ by not changing the release criteria for IPPs I, and other IPPs, face the almost impossible task of convincing a negative focused Parole board that I’m ready for release or open conditions.
        Can anyone tell me how I’m supposed to remain ‘focused’ and ‘positive’ about the future? Parole Boards only listen to OMU, probation and psychology when they are being negative, positives are virtually ignored. There is always a reason to say no, there is always a course that a prisoner would ‘benefit from’. If the Government suddenly banned guns because they are dangerous would they allow those that already had them to keep them? No. So why, when they are allegedly scrapping the IPP sentence are we still subjected to its inhumane unfairness?
        We have all (or most of us) committed offences and I’m genuinely loathed to paint myself as a ‘victim’. If I hadn’t committed the crime I wouldn’t have been imprisoned in the first place, obviously we all accept that. But, unfortunately, very few of the 6000+ IPPs deserved this inhumane and soul destroying, unfair sentence.
        CONTINUED BELOW

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Does anyone, anywhere, have any answers or advice that doesn’t include the words: ‘keep your chin up’?
        The Parole Board are keen to stress that they act in the public interest (more specifically the press). Fine, that is commendable, if obvious, but it is only part of the story. However, by using this as the default answer for constant knockbacks all they are achieving is to create a large portion of the prison population that are little more than burned out basket cases. The longer anyone stays in prison the harder it becomes to function as a ‘normal’ human being. It is the worst kind of Catch 22.
        After months of debate in the Lords nothing tangible has been done to give IPPs any hope of re-entering society. Facilitating even more courses is largely ineffective because even if you’ve done them the Parole Board still won’t let you out. There’s always another course around the corner. Never mind that someone might have lived 95% of their lives decently and offence free they are pretty much given up on as a lost cause. Logic and reason are foreign concepts.
        I spent 1½ years on bail whilst admitting my guilt. The police, a magistrate and a Crown Court judge all felt that I was not too ‘dangerous’ to be in the community, yet the sentencing judge did.
        I know that I’ve dwelled a fair bit on my own situation and I make no apologies for that. But there are 6000+ of us in the same black hole. I’ll end with these points:
        1. Sentencing is widely and widely inconsistent. A huge amount of prisoners have received IPPs while a huge amount committing the same, similar or more serious offences have received lesser, determinate sentences (it helps if you are a civil servant).
        2. Even though all the agencies dealing with a prisoner now and in the future confidently agree that you can be safely ‘managed’ in the community, three negatively focused strangers say no virtually every time.
        3. There is a well established ‘obsession’ with courses. And because we can never know if a prisoner will re-offend or not without courses, it is logically impossible to claim that courses work. Indeed there is evidence that they don’t. If I gave a friend a biscuit and told him it was a cure for cancer and he died at 96 of natural causes, what would people say if I said to them ‘See, I told you it would work!’
        4. Finally, prisoners/criminal/offenders are HUMAN BEINGS (contrary to popular and press belief). The IPP sentence treats prisoners and their families with contempt and serves no genuinely rehabilitative purpose. It should be consigned, totally, to the dustbin of history …. . for all our sakes.
        Mark Banner is currently resident at HMP Stafford
        The nightmare continues By Mark Banner , from insidetime issue October 2012http://www.insidetime.org/articleview.asp?a=1404&c=the_nightmare_continues

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Does anyone, anywhere, have any answers or advice that doesn’t include the words: ‘keep your chin up’?
        The Parole Board are keen to stress that they act in the public interest (more specifically the press). Fine, that is commendable, if obvious, but it is only part of the story. However, by using this as the default answer for constant knockbacks all they are achieving is to create a large portion of the prison population that are little more than burned out basket cases. The longer anyone stays in prison the harder it becomes to function as a ‘normal’ human being. It is the worst kind of Catch 22.
        After months of debate in the Lords nothing tangible has been done to give IPPs any hope of re-entering society. Facilitating even more courses is largely ineffective because even if you’ve done them the Parole Board still won’t let you out. There’s always another course around the corner. Never mind that someone might have lived 95% of their lives decently and offence free they are pretty much given up on as a lost cause. Logic and reason are foreign concepts.
        I spent 1½ years on bail whilst admitting my guilt. The police, a magistrate and a Crown Court judge all felt that I was not too ‘dangerous’ to be in the community, yet the sentencing judge did.
        I know that I’ve dwelled a fair bit on my own situation and I make no apologies for that. But there are 6000+ of us in the same black hole. I’ll end with these points:
        1. Sentencing is widely and widely inconsistent. A huge amount of prisoners have received IPPs while a huge amount committing the same, similar or more serious offences have received lesser, determinate sentences (it helps if you are a civil servant).
        2. Even though all the agencies dealing with a prisoner now and in the future confidently agree that you can be safely ‘managed’ in the community, three negatively focused strangers say no virtually every time.
        3. There is a well established ‘obsession’ with courses. And because we can never know if a prisoner will re-offend or not without courses, it is logically impossible to claim that courses work. Indeed there is evidence that they don’t. If I gave a friend a biscuit and told him it was a cure for cancer and he died at 96 of natural causes, what would people say if I said to them ‘See, I told you it would work!’
        4. Finally, prisoners/criminal/offenders are HUMAN BEINGS (contrary to popular and press belief). The IPP sentence treats prisoners and their families with contempt and serves no genuinely rehabilitative purpose. It should be consigned, totally, to the dustbin of history …. . for all our sakes.
        Mark Banner is currently resident at HMP Stafford
        The nightmare continues By Mark Banner , from insidetime issue October 2012http://www.insidetime.org/articleview.asp?a=1404&c=the_nightmare_continues

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Spreading the Word for the IPP prisoners, 6000. There called The ‘disappeared’, locked in prisons in England and Wales are held on IPPs. In June the Government passed the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (LASPO) into law. This included the abolition of IPPs. However, three months down the line the Government has no strategy for dealing with the thousands of prisoners currently trapped in the system.

      • AnonymousAnonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I am a recently released lifer and i am willing to help out when i can. I have had experience with some of the issues that this sentence has on men and women, this is inhumane.

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        To The House of Commons

        Petition http://www.ippprisonerscampaign.com/petition.htm

        The petition of IPP Prisoners campaign, their members and supporters hereby declare that we are petitioning the house following the amendments introduced in the current Legal Aid Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders bill (LASPO) which lead to the abolition of the problematic and ill thought out Indeterminate Sentence for Public Protection (IPP). In 2007 the green paper ‘Prisons with a purpose’ mentioned that ‘the prison service should try and deal with prisoners before the end of their minimum tariff’ and the fact that many Ipp prisoners can neither get onto the requisite course in their current prison nor be moved to another prison where a particular course, deemed necessary for the prisoner to show that they are no longer a danger to the public, is available’. If they are able to obtain a place on a course they have often had to first be placed on an extensive waiting list. Currently these courses are a requirement for them to demonstrate that they have lowered their risk (1). They also continually face many other problems which include parole board delays and lack of continuity in offender management. The Justice Secretary showed that on 8th October 2007 the amount of post tariff IPP prisoners was approximately 400 and that this was 0.5% of the current prison population (1).Recent figures from The Ministry of Justice however show that as of 31st December 2011 there were 6162 IPP prisoners of which 3489 had passed their tariff thus those over tariff made up 4.049% of the then current prison population, this opposed to the previous 0.5% is an increase of over 800%. These figures demonstrate that although the plight IPP prisoners faced was evident no firm measures had been implemented and without these issues addressed imminently the problem will just continue to escalate.

        Due to this ongoing plight IPP Prisoners face, we the petitioners request that the House of Commons release on license all those currently serving an IPP sentence on or at tariff expiry, unless it can be definitively proven that the prisoner is considered a high risk to the public. For those that are considered such a said risk then plans be put in place and implemented allowing them the opportunity to lower their risk in a satisfactory manner.

        By signing this petition the petitioners are voluntarily offering their full support to the requests made within this petition.

        Please Return Completed Petitions to Amanda Goodall, IPP Prisoners Campaign, 24 Chevallier Street, Ipswich, IP1 2PD

        Due to this ongoing plight IPP Prisoners face, we the petitioners request that the House of Commons release on license all those currently serving an IPP sentence on or at tariff expiry, unless it can be definitively proven that the prisoner is considered a high risk to the public. For those that are considered such a said risk then plans be put in place and implemented allowing them the opportunity to lower their risk in a satisfactory manner.

        By signing this petition the petitioners are voluntarily offering their full support to the requests made within this petition.
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHC9wAOSjW0
        http://ippfanilycampaign.blogspot.co.uk/
        Ipp Campaing videos http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAvvQbhEZ5Q

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        IPP you could be imprisoned for up to 99 years.At the moment it is still up to the prisoner to prove that they are safe forrelease which is what makes it impossible as you cannot prove you are safe torelease as you are in prison. It is then up to a parole board to decide if theyfeel you are ready to be released back in to society, so prisoners and theirfamilies do not know IF or WHEN they will EVER be released, this in itself ismental TORTURE, DEGRADING & INHUMANE. The main point of our campaign is not to argue whether ornot the prisoners deserved to go to prison - The fact of the matter is thateven if it means that prisoners are given longer sentences - be it 2 years, 3years, 5 years, 10 years, or even 25 years - then every human on this planetdeserves to know when they will be home with their children and/or familiesagain, they deserve to know what time they have to serve, change the existingIPP sentences over to determinate sentences.

        Detaining people on the basis of what they may possibly do in the future is wholly unjust. punishing people for what they may possibly do in future is a repellent act IPP's can only be released if they can show that they have addressed their offending behaviour. This is done by as mentioned by completing offending behaviour courses and then parading these achievements before the Parole Board. There is Insufficient places on these courses for them to complete them before the end of their tariff. If your tariff is 18 months the waiting list for these course is 2 years, there is no chance for you to demonstrate before the Perol board that you are fit for release. over their tariff and the Ministry accepts that this is not necessarily the fault of the prisoners. So bizarre and wicked is this situation, that the HighCourt ruled last year that, in effect, the sentence has become so arbitrary as
        to become unlawful.
        The higher courts plugged this political problem on the well known legaldoctrine of "tough shit". And so these men remain in prison. Thecourts have ruled that this is a terrible situation but, alas, there is no one in particular to blame. And so they have now blocked IPP's from launching legalchallenges to demand their right to a parole hearing. It's no one’s fault, so we are back to QUOTE tough sh..
        government, quick to throw people in prison, neglected to provide the resourcesfor these prisoners to undertake their offending behaviour courses, and failedto fund the Parole Board for this doubling of their workload. This situationreflects a profound shift in sentencing philosophy that was overlooked bylegislatures and society. Rather a fixed time for the crime committed, many arenow detained not only for the crime, but on the basis of what they may do infuture

        If prisoner got 2 years they could do 10 years or more ...because there not allowed on the Courses because to a learning differance dyslexia or other.....
        https://www.facebook.com/groups/322989171073819/

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        What is IPP? - IPP stands for Indeterminate sentence for Public Protection - What this actually means is if you were to go to court and receive a 2 year sentence, 3 years, 4 years, etc..... with IPP you could be imprisoned for up to 99 years.

        At the moment it is still up to the prisoner to prove that they are safe for release which is what makes it impossible as you cannot prove you are safe to release as you are in prison.

        It is then up to a parole board to decide if they feel you are ready to be released back in to society, so prisoners and their families do not know IF or WHEN they will EVER be released.

        You may be thinking right now that "well, if they have committed murder or something along those lines then they deserve it" - But they have NOT committed murder, if you were sentenced for murder you would receive a determinate sentence of approx 25 years or more - but you would know when you were due to be released and have something to work towards, in retrospect these 3,200 prisoners left in limbo (Guantanimo Bay) would have actually been released by now had they committed a manslaughter or murder.

        IPP Prisoners are literally being left in limbo. A lot of IPP prisoners do not have any family support and feel that there is no hope left for them and it is because of this that approx every 2 weeks a suicide is reported in prison.

        Where has it all gone wrong? There are currently around 3,200 prisoners that are still incarcerated beyond their tariff - Prisoners that received 2 years that were supposed to be released 9 years ago are actually still serving that sentence because there is no effective system in place that works. Ken Clarke last year abolished IPP and stated that it is inhumane - so now we need to move forward and deal with the IPPs that were already serving before it was abolished last year.

        This is why the UK prisons are overcrowded and it's costing Tax-payers more and more every year, maybe this is one of the many causes as to why the United Kingdom has hit a debt of £3,000,000,000,000 -

        It actually costs £41,000 per year per prisoner in the UK - Now, multiply that by 3,200 - the result of keeping just these 3,200 prisoners in past their tariff is costing us all £131,200,000 every year, that's without the cost of the rest.

        Now, the old saying goes - If you can't do the time, don't do the crime - But, how can a prisoner serve their time if they do not know how much time they have to do?Ipp Prisoners Familys Campaign.

        For thousands of IPP prisoners who are long past the tariff laid down by the courts when they were sentenced, this comes as worrying news indeed. To their families, it is nothing short of devastation.

        The families and children of those incarcerated in an unjust and unfair penal system suffer as their loved ones remain in custody when they should have been given the chance of release long ago.Our 1 aim is to get a fixed determinate sentence for IPP prisoners.

        Lobbying for change The Court of Appeal has ruled that it's unlawful for someone given an "indeterminate sentence for public protection" (IPP) to be kept in prison beyond his 'tariff' (the period set by the sentencing judge as the minimum required for punishment, release thereafter being permitted on condition that the offender satisfies the parole board that he won't reoffend) if he hasn't been able to take one of the prison courses whose completion is a condition of release. It

        seems that a thousand or more prisoners serving IPPs are in this Kafkaesque, nightmare logical trap. It is a life sentence in all but name. The only real difference is that it can be given for far less serious offences. But even after the tariff, the person remains in prison until they have done the courses necessary to demonstrate they are ready for release. He would only be released if he "admitted guilt" Mr. Blunt commented that the previous Government had to reform the IPP arrangements in 2008, and that the current Government had inherited ‘a very serious problem’ with IPP prisoners. He said, ‘we have 6,000 IPP prisoners, well over 2,500 of whom have exceeded their tariff point. Many cannot get on courses because our prisons are wholly overcrowded and (they are) unable to address offending behaviour. For example if you had a prison term of 3years you may have five offending courses to finish as part of your sentence plan before you can be released. 18 month waiting list to do 1 course and that’s if they have the course at all at that prison .So instead of doing 3 years it may be 5 years or more until you have finished the courses. It seems you have to be smart to badger the prison to get on these courses..

      • KATHERINE GLEESONKATHERINE GLEESON commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Target: LASPO, The House ofLords, The Government, Ken Clarke, The Queen

        Sponsored by: Lorna Elliott -Solicitor, IPP Prisoners Familys Campaign & Emmersons Solicitors

        IPP is inhumane, against humanrights and breaches Human Rights Act 1998 Article 3 Prohibition of Torture - Noone shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment orpunishmentIPP stands for Indeterminate sentence for Public Protection - What thisactually means is if you were to go to court and receive a 2 year sentence, 3years, 4 years, etc..... with IPP you could be imprisoned for up to 99 years.Atthe moment it is still up to the prisoner to prove that they are safe forrelease which is what makes it impossible as you cannot prove you are safe torelease as you are in prison.It is then up to a parole board to decide if theyfeel you are ready to be released back in to society, so prisoners and theirfamilies do not know IF or WHEN they will EVER be released, this in itself ismental TORTURE, DEGRADING & INHUMANE.There are currently over 3,200prisoners that are over their tariff which is costing £41,000 each year foreach prisoner to remain in prison. For 3,200 prisoners this amounts to£131,200,000 each year and in total there are 88,000 prisoners in prison inthe UK.The main point of our campaign is not to argue whether or not theprisoners deserved to go to prison - The fact of the matter is that even if itmeans that prisoners are given longer sentences - be it 2 years, 3 years, 5years, 10 years, or even 25 years - then every human on this planet deserves toknow when they will be home with their children and/or families again, theydeserve to know what time they have to serve, change the existing IPP sentencesover to determinate sentences. less

        IPP is inhumane, against humanrights and breaches Human Rights Act 1998 Article 3 Prohibition of Torture - Noone shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment orpunishmentIPP stands for Indeterminate sentence for Public Protection - What thisactually means is if you were to go to court and receive a 2 year sentence, 3years, 4 years, etc..... with IPP you could be imprisoned for up to 99 years.At the moment it is still up to the prisoner to prove that they are safe forrelease which is what makes it impossible as you cannot prove you are safe torelease as you are in prison. It is then up to a parole board to decide if theyfeel you are ready to be released back in to society, so prisoners and theirfamilies do not know IF or WHEN they will EVER be released, this in itself ismental TORTURE, DEGRADING & INHUMANE. There are currently over 3,200prisoners that are over their tariff which is costing £41,000 each year foreach prisoner to remain in prison. to remain in prison. For 3,200 prisonersthis amounts to £131,200,000 each year and in total there are 88,000 prisonersin prison in the UK. The main point of our campaign is not to argue whether ornot the prisoners deserved to go to prison - The fact of the matter is thateven if it means that prisoners are given longer sentences - be it 2 years, 3years, 5 years, 10 years, or even 25 years - then every human on this planetdeserves to know when they will be home with their children and/or familiesagain, they deserve to know what time they have to serve, change the existingIPP sentences over to determinate sentences.

        Petition http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/Determinate-Sentences-for-IPP/

      • AnonymousAnonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        A close family member has just received an APP with a minimum tariff of 5 years. He's only 17 and I've been told his sentence is more likely to be 8-10 years, even if he does all the courses and stays out of trouble. This system is grossly unfair, surely they must see that with no hope in sight, no release date, people are going to give up. People should be punished for committing crime but they should have a definitive sentence.

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