I suggest a campaign about ...

A ban of chinese lanterns

Chinese lanterns - paper lanterns with candles inside - are released at outdoor events and can float for several miles before crashing to the ground. They can cause injury or death if eaten by animals. They are a fire risk to crops, woods and thatched houses. They can be confused with distress flairs. A small boy has also been injured when boiling wax fell from a Chinese lantern and landed on his face, almost blinding him.

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    KateKate shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    3 comments

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      • AliahAliah commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I wondered if it would be possible to raise some concerns with action@38degrees about the use of Chinese lanterns.

        They have apparently been the cause of fires in agricultural buildings, and the possible cause of some moorland fires. The wire frames once deposited on the ground have been accidentally eaten by livestock such as bovines / other grazing animals in fields resulting in lacerations to the internal organs and an excruciating death for the animal.

        Recently I received an enquiry from the local police in West Yorkshire that they have have had some false call outs for 'aircrafts seen to be falling from the skies'. This has resulted in a full emergency call out for the ambulance, police, aviation authorities, etc. costing the organisations involved thousands of pounds each time. This particular matter was raised by an officer at a meeting I attended in the Bradford District recently.

        Just like helium balloons, Chinese lanterns look great for a few minutes when released but will travel over substantial distances and where they land in fields or watercourses, they can create hazards to livestock, wildlife and property as well as physically depositing litter, which could also constitute fly tipping ....' the deposition of materials on to another persons land without consent' ...although in reality tracing the person who originally released the lantern / balloon could prove difficult for the Local Authority Enforcement Teams.

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